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Brand Pattern

Space Launch

Launching RASCube into orbit from 2024

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Brief Introduction

In October 2024, RASCube will launch into orbit aboard a prototype space capsule, built by European start-up The Exploration Company. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the capsule into space, where it will orbit Earth for a period of time, before returning to Earth for a safe landing and recovery. 

This project is in collaboration with VXS Space, a space project run by 11-year-old Jackson Burford, who is putting an experiment inside of RASCube!

 

Image: First prototype of RASCube 'Space Edition'

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RASCube's Mission

The primary objective of this mission is to put a space qualified version of RASCube into orbit, bring it back to Earth and display it for students to see. This is to help us directly link the in-class version of RASCube to real space hardware. 

Our secondary objective is to gather data from the launch and allow schools to access it. This will allow students to analyse data from a real space mission!

A Global Effort

Robinson Aerospace (Australia): Develops RASCube's electronics, structure, software and sensor suite.

VXS Space (Australia): Develops VEXUS sub-payload to measure radiation.

The Exploration Company (Europe): Builds space capsule to safely bring RASCube back to Earth, for recovery. 

SpaceX (USA): Launches space capsule into orbit.

 

Image: Hannah Ashford (TEC), Jackson Burford (VXS Space) and Edward Robinson (Robinson Aerospace) at the ISU Adelaide Conference, where RASCube's space launch was announced

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VEXUS Payload

11-year-old Jackson Burford is developing a sub-payload (circuit board) which will be securely mounted inside of RASCube during the mission. The sub-payload will measure radiation, magnetic fields and types of shielding during its time in orbit. 

This project is a clear indicator of the huge growth in Australia's space industry, since the Space Agency was founded in 2018. Australia has gone from almost no space activity, to enabling an 11-year-old to launch his project into orbit!

More announcements coming soon...

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